Roland Schmehl 2020

Press/Media: Public Engagement Activities

Period11 Dec 2019 → 12 Feb 2020

Media coverage

3

Media coverage

  • TitleGli aquiloni che catturano il vento e producono energia pulita
    Degree of recognitionInternational
    Media name/outletGreen Planrt News
    Media typeWeb
    Duration/Length/Size1 pag.
    CountryItaly
    Date12/02/20
    DescriptionL’idea è sostituire le attuali pale eoliche con aquiloni per catturare il vento aumentando l’efficienza energetica. Un progetto finanziato dalla Comunità Europea che presto potrebbe essere commercializzato portando un notevole abbassamento dei costi delle rinnovabili. Un'ala gonfiabile connessa a un generatore di terra da un cavo ad elevate prestazioni
    Producer/AuthorEmanuela Testai
    URLhttps://www.greenplanetnews.it/gli-aquiloni-che-catturano-il-vento-e-producono-energia-pulita/
    PersonsR. Schmehl
  • TitleEnergia pulita, gli “aquiloni” per catturare il vento e abbassare i costi delle rinnovabili. Il progetto finanziato dall’Ue
    Degree of recognitionNational
    Media name/outletIl Fatto Quotidiano
    Media typeWeb
    Duration/Length/Size1 pag.
    CountryItaly
    Date13/01/20
    DescriptionUn'ala gonfiabile connessa a un generatore di terra da un cavo in plastica ad elevate prestazioni: è l'idea in sviluppo da parte dell'Unione europea per abbattere i costi di produzione dell'energia eolica, aumentando nel contempo l'efficienza rispetto alle classiche pale eoliche
    URLhttps://www.ilfattoquotidiano.it/2020/01/13/energia-pulita-gli-aquiloni-per-catturare-il-vento-e-abbassare-i-costi-delle-rinnovabili-il-progetto-finanziato-dallue/5667088/
    PersonsR. Schmehl
  • TitleAirborne Wind Energy Prepares for Take Off
    Degree of recognitionInternational
    Media name/outletEngineering
    Media typePrint
    Duration/Length/Size3 pag.
    CountryNetherlands
    Date11/12/19
    DescriptionDuring a test flight off Norway’s coast, a team of wind-energy pioneers watched as what looked like a very big toy plane took off from the bobbing, jumbo-sized buoy to which it remained tethered (Fig. 1). To safely land the nearly 2-ton [1], experimental drone back onto its floating base-station, the vehicle’s automatic flight control system would have to guide it through maneuvers that a wind-energy leader compared to “trying to parallel park a car with the curb shifting forward, backward, up and down” [2]. With the automatic flight control system taking cues from the team’s simulations of the possible motions at sea of both the aircraft and buoy, the landing proved flawless, reported the drone’s makers, suggesting that a similar drone might sometime soon harvest wind power off coasts around the world.
    Producer/AuthorPeter Weiss
    URLhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.eng.2019.12.002
    PersonsR. Schmehl