A new rate-dependent stress-based nonlocal damage model to simulate dynamic tensile failure of quasi-brittle materials

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23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The development of realistic numerical tools to efficiently model the response of concrete structures subjected to close-in detonations and high velocity impact has been one of the major quests in defense research. Under these loading conditions, quasi-brittle materials undergo a multitude of failure (damage) mechanisms. Dynamic tensile failure (e.g. spalling), characterized by a significant strength increase associated with loading rate, has revealed to be particularly challenging to represent. In this contribution, a rate-dependent stress-based nonlocal damage model has been introduced for the simulation of dynamic tensile failure of quasi-brittle materials. The recently proposed stress-based nonlocal criterion has been updated in order to be consistently combined with a rate-dependent version of the well-known Mazars damage model. The model was implemented in LS-DYNA using a fully explicit computational scheme. Two sets of numerical examples have been presented. First, one-dimensional numerical analyses were conducted to evaluate the model capabilities, applicability and limitations. Second, the model has been validated against experimental results. It has been shown that the proposed model, in addition to correcting spurious mesh sensitivity, also provides a more realistic representation of damage initiation and growth, in particular around discontinuities (notches and free boundaries) and damaged areas.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)83-95
Number of pages13
JournalInternational Journal of Impact Engineering
Volume94
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2016

Keywords

  • Concrete
  • Damage
  • Rate-dependent
  • Stress-based nonlocal
  • Tensile failure

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