A review and framework of Control Authority Transitions in automated driving

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceedings/Edited volumeConference contributionScientificpeer-review

26 Citations (Scopus)
55 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The paper reviews some of the essentials of human-machine interaction in automated driving, focusing on control authority transitions. We introduce a driving state model describing the human monitoring level and the allocation of lateral and longitudinal control tasks. An authority transition in automated driving is defined as the process of changing from one static state of driving to another static state. Based on (1) who initiates the transition and (2) who is in control after the transition, we categorize transitions into four types: driver-initiated driver control (DIDC), driver-initiated automation control (DIAC), automation-initiated driver control (AIDC), and automation-initiated automation control (AIAC). Finally, we discuss the effects of human-machine interfaces on driving performance during transitions.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProcedia Manufacturing - 6th International Conference on Applied Human Factors and Ergonomics (AHFE 2015) and the Affiliated Conferences, AHFE 2015
EditorsTareq Ahram, Waldemar Karwowski, Dylan Schmorrow
PublisherElsevier
Pages2510-2517
Volume3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015
EventThe 6th international conference on applied human factors and ergonomics (AHFE 2015) and the affiliated conferences, AHFE 2015, Las Vegas, United States of America - s.l.
Duration: 26 Jul 201530 Jul 2015

Publication series

NameProcedia Manufacturing
Volume3
ISSN (Print)2351-9789

Conference

ConferenceThe 6th international conference on applied human factors and ergonomics (AHFE 2015) and the affiliated conferences, AHFE 2015, Las Vegas, United States of America
Period26/07/1530/07/15

Keywords

  • Automated driving
  • Control authority transitions
  • Driving states

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