Advancing Reed-Based Architecture through Circular Digital Fabrication

H.E. Bouza, S. Asut

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceedings/Edited volumeConference contributionScientificpeer-review

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Abstract

This paper presents a completed research project that proposes a new approach
for creating circular buildings through the use of biodegradable, in situ resources with the help of computational design and digital fabrication technologies. Common Reed (Phragmites Australis) is an abundantly available natural material found throughout the world. Reed is typically used for thatch roofing in Europe, providing insulation and a weather-tight surface. Elsewhere, traditional techniques of weaving and bundling reeds have long been used to create entire buildings. The use of a digital production chain was explored as a means towards expanding the potential of reed as a sustainable, locally produced, construction material. Following an iterative process of designing from the micro to the macro scale and by experimenting with robotic assembly, the result is a reed-based system in the form of discrete components that can be configured to create a variety of structures.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 38th eCAADe
Subtitle of host publicationAnthropologic – Architecture and Fabrication in the cognitive age
Pages117-126
Volume1
Publication statusPublished - 2020
EventeCAADe 2020 (Online): 38th International Conference on Education and Research in Computer Aided Architectural Design in Europe - Berlin, Germany
Duration: 16 Sep 202017 Sep 2020

Conference

ConferenceeCAADe 2020 (Online): 38th International Conference on Education and Research in Computer Aided Architectural Design in Europe
CountryGermany
CityBerlin
Period16/09/2017/09/20

Keywords

  • Phragmites Australis
  • Reed
  • Discrete Design
  • Robotic Assembly
  • Circular Design
  • Biodegradable Architecture

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