Aerodynamics of a cycling wheel in crosswind by coaxial volumetric velocimetry

C. Jux*, A. Sciacchitano, F. Scarano

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceedings/Edited volumeConference contributionScientificpeer-review

27 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The aerodynamic characteristics of a modern road cycling wheel in crosswind are studied through force measurements and 3D velocimetry in TU Delft’s Open Jet Facility. The performance of the 62 mm deep rim is evaluated for two tire profiles, and yaw angles up to 20◦ . All measurements are executed at 12.5 m/s (45 km/h) freestream- and wheel-rotational velocity. The wheel’s rim-tire section in crosswind is found to behave similar to an airfoil at incidence, ultimately resulting in a reduction of the wheel’s aerodynamic resistance with increasing yaw angle magnitude. This trend, also referred to as the sail-effect, is limited by the stall angle of the tire-rim profile. The stall angle is found to be dependent on the tire surface texture and varies between 14◦ and 20◦.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication14th International Symposium on Particle Image Velocimetry
Number of pages11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021
Event14th International Symposium on Particle Image Velocimetry - virtual event
Duration: 1 Aug 20215 Aug 2021
Conference number: 14

Conference

Conference14th International Symposium on Particle Image Velocimetry
Abbreviated titleISPIV 2021
Period1/08/215/08/21

Bibliographical note

Green Open Access added to TU Delft Institutional Repository ‘You share, we take care!’ – Taverne project https://www.openaccess.nl/en/you-share-we-take-care
Otherwise as indicated in the copyright section: the publisher is the copyright holder of this work and the author uses the Dutch legislation to make this work public.

Keywords

  • 3D PIV
  • Wheel aerodynamics
  • Cycling aerodynamics
  • Pressure analysis
  • Coaxial volumetric velocimetry

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Aerodynamics of a cycling wheel in crosswind by coaxial volumetric velocimetry'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this