Assessing residential Smart Grids pilot projects, products and services: Insights from stakeholders, end-users from a design perspective

Uche Obinna

Research output: ThesisDissertation (TU Delft)

43 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The transition of the electricity system to smart grids would require from residential endusers to adapt to a new role of co-provider or active participants in the electricity system. End-users would for instance use energy efficiently, generate renewable energy locally, plan or shift energy consumption to most favourable times (such as when renewable energy is most abundant or during low peak periods), and trade self-produced electricity with other households. In a residential smart grid, a large part of the electricity supply in households will be generated by various decentralized energy resources like wind turbines, photovoltaic (PV) solar systems and micro-cogeneration systems. In this context, smart grids are supposed to provide the opportunity to make optimal use of renewable energy by matching demand to supply conditions, thereby facilitating the energy transition towards a more sustainable and less fossil fuel dependent society.
Original languageEnglish
Awarding Institution
  • Delft University of Technology
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Reinders, Angèle, Supervisor
  • Joore, J.P., Advisor
Award date20 Nov 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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