Benefits and pitfalls in the longitudinal assessment of the somatosensory cortex post-stroke using EEG

Konstantina Kalogianni

Research output: ThesisDissertation (TU Delft)

24 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Somatosensory cortex plays an important role in motor planning and execution.
After ischemic stroke, both afferent projections to sensory cortices (S1/2) and sensory projections to motor cortices are often affected. Changes in S1 are particularly interesting for our understanding of stroke recovery and rehabilitation strategies. The assessment of sensory impairment after stroke can certainly benefit from affordable and ambulant imaging modalities, like electroencephalography (EEG). Somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) recorded with EEG may be used to follow stroke patients longitudinally. In order to detect changes occurring in S1, precise measurements and with high spatial resolution are obligatory. In the present thesis, I first evaluated the capacity of SEPs for tracking longitudinal stroke recovery. Subsequently, I explored the potential benefits and pitfalls of EEG-based monitoring of stroke patients.
Original languageEnglish
Awarding Institution
  • Delft University of Technology
Supervisors/Advisors
  • van der Helm, F.C.T., Supervisor
  • Daffertshofer, Andreas, Supervisor, External person
  • de Munck, Jan C., Advisor, External person
  • Schouten, A.C., Advisor
Award date9 May 2018
Print ISBNs978-94-6233-950-7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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