Can thermal perception in a building be predicted by the perceived spatial openness of a building in a hot and humid climate?

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceedings/Edited volumeConference contributionScientificpeer-review

26 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The authors wanted to prove that there is a large correlation between the concepts spatial openness and comfort (visual, wind speed and thermal) perception in people’s minds in a hot and humid climate in summer in order to be able to use spatial configuration parameters such as openness, connectivity and depth as a design tool for a comfortable an energy efficient building in the early design stages. 513 local Chinese college architecture students in 2015 were questioned about the relationship between spatial openness and comfort perception. The main findings for a hot and humid climate are: a. spatial openness of a particular space significantly effects occupants’ visual perception, wind speed perception and thermal perception in a particular space (p < .05). b. There is a strong effect size between spatial openness and visual and wind perception (w = .50 and .54); the effect size of the thermal perception is weaker (w = .14). c. The comfort perception is strongly influenced by the time of day, therefore visual perception, wind perception and thermal perception can influence occupant movement between different spaces as is the advice of the adaptive thermal comfort.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 33rd PLEA International Conference
Subtitle of host publicationDesign to Thrive
EditorsLuisa Brotas, Susan Roaf, Fergus Nicol
Place of PublicationEdinburgh
PublisherNetwork for Comfort and Energy Use in Buildings (NCEUB)
Pages1053-1060
VolumeI
ISBN (Print)978-0-9928957-5-4
Publication statusPublished - 2017
EventPLEA 2017: 33rd International Conference "Design to Thrive" - Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Duration: 3 Jul 20175 Jul 2017
https://plea2017.net/

Conference

ConferencePLEA 2017: 33rd International Conference "Design to Thrive"
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityEdinburgh
Period3/07/175/07/17
Internet address

Keywords

  • Spatial openness
  • Thermal environment
  • Perception
  • Adaptive thermal comfort

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Can thermal perception in a building be predicted by the perceived spatial openness of a building in a hot and humid climate?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this