Classification of bore patterns induced by storm waves overtopping a dike crest and their impact types on dike mounted vertical walls – A large-scale model study

Maximilian Streicher, Andreas Kortenhaus, Krasimir Marinov, Matthias Hirt, Steven Hughes, Bas Hofland, Babette Scheres, Holger Schüttrumpf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)
7 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Short duration bores in the coastal zone are generated by wave breaking in shallow water and mild foreshore conditions. In storm weather situations and for sea level rise scenarios, these bores approach the dike and interact with previously overtopped or reflected bores. Combined laser scanner and video measurements were used to study the complex and turbulent bore interaction processes. Five bore interaction patterns were distinguished as (1) regular bore pattern; (2) collision bore pattern; (3) plunging breaking bore pattern; (4) sequential overtopping bore pattern, and (5) catch-up bore pattern. Video images of the bore running up the wall and motion tracking of the leading edge were used to obtain a time series of the run-up water at the wall. The impact loads of the bore hitting the wall on the promenade were studied based on the signal of a vertical array of 13 pressure sensors installed over the wall height. Three impact types were distinguished and classified as (1) impulsive impact type; (2) dynamic impact type; and (3) quasi-static impact type. The majority of ~2/3 of the total number of impacts were comprised of the quasi-static impact type.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)321-339
Number of pages19
JournalCoastal Engineering Journal
Volume61
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Keywords

  • Bore impact
  • large-scale physical model
  • overtopping bore
  • pressure and force
  • sea dike
  • vertical crest wall
  • WALOWA project

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