Co-designing for active, healthy ageing: the synergies of social and built environment

E. Chrysikou, Dimitris Milakis, C. Tziraki-Segal

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractScientific

Abstract

Aims
Despite the fact that the WHO stresses the role of the built environment as key determinant for an autonomous life in wellbeing, architecture and health still are not connected in architectural and medical education and as a result in architectural and medical practice. This paper aims toDespite the fact that the WHO stresses the role of the built environment as key determinant for an autonomous life in wellbeing, architecture and health still are not connected in architectural and medical education and as a result in architectural and medical practice. This paper aims to provide a targeted overview of the theory for the need to educate and create a dialogue between designers, healthcare professionals and entrepreneurs of retirement and chronic facility sector.
Theoretical approach
The paper puts together the existing architectural thinking such as space syntax, normalization theory, architectural guidelines for dementia, universal design and accessibility theories and juxtaposes them to the cognitive and physical evolution of human needs throughout the lifespan, as expressed by the current medical evidence base. It cherry-picks the elements that each theory could contribute to a fit for purpose design practice that would be in accordance to the recent demographical shift.
Conclusions
The paper stresses the fact that a more inclusive architecture that is in line with the perception and the physiological needs of the people throughout their lifespan could create domestic, healthcare and public environments that work in synergies with medical and technological interventions through a mechanism of enabling. These solutions could be low cost or even noadding- cost compared to conventional architecture but require a shift in design methodologies of all scales to more evidence-based and inclusive perspectives.
provide a targeted overview of the theory for the need to educate and create a dialogue
between designers, healthcare professionals and entrepreneurs of retirement and chronic
facility sector.
Theoretical approach
The paper puts together the existing architectural thinking such as space syntax, normalization
theory, architectural guidelines for dementia, universal design and accessibility theories and
juxtaposes them to the cognitive and physical evolution of human needs throughout the
lifespan, as expressed by the current medical evidence base. It cherry-picks the elements that
each theory could contribute to a fit for purpose design practice that would be in accordance to
the recent demographical shift.
Conclusions
The paper stresses the fact that a more inclusive architecture that is in line with the perception
and the physiological needs of the people throughout their lifespan could create domestic,
healthcare and public environments that work in synergies with medical and technological
interventions through a mechanism of enabling. These solutions could be low cost or even noadding-
cost compared to conventional architecture but require a shift in design methodologies
of all scales to more evidence-based and inclusive perspectives.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 2016
EventMobility, Mood and Place: Habitats for Happy and Healthy Ageing - John McIntyre Conference Centre, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Duration: 11 Oct 201614 Oct 2016
https://sites.eca.ed.ac.uk/mmp/files/2016/10/MMP-conference-proceedings-161011-FINAL.pdf

Conference

ConferenceMobility, Mood and Place
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityEdinburgh
Period11/10/1614/10/16
Internet address

Keywords

  • Healthy aging
  • health
  • healthcare architecture
  • accessibility
  • architectural education

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