Comparison in clinical performance of surgical guides for mandibular surgery and temporomandibular joint implants fabricated by additive manufacturing techniques

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Abstract

Additive manufacturing (AM) offers great design freedom that enables objects with desired unique and complex geometry and topology to be readily and cost-effectively fabricated. The overall benefits of AM are well known, such as increased material and resource efficiency, enhanced design and production flexibility, the ability to create porous structures and on-demand manufacturing. When AM is applied to medical devices, these benefits are naturally assumed. However, hard clinical evidence collected from clinical trials and studies seems to be lacking and, as a result, systematic assessment is yet difficult. In the present work, we have reviewed 23 studies on the clinical use of AM patient-specific surgical guides (PSGs) for the mandible surgeries (n = 17) and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) patient-specific implants (PSIs) (n = 6) with respect to expected clinical outcomes. It is concluded that the data published on these AM medical devices are often lacking in comprehensive evaluation of clinical outcomes. A complete set of clinical data, including those on time management, costs, clinical outcomes, range of motion, accuracy of the placement with respect to the pre-operative planning, and extra complications, as well as manufacturing data are needed to demonstrate the real benefits gained from applying AM to these medical devices and to satisfy regulatory requirements.

Original languageEnglish
Article number104512
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials
Volume119
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Keywords

  • Additive manufacturing
  • Patient-specific implants
  • Surgical guides
  • Temporomandibular joint

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