Design of test signals for identification of neuromuscular admittance

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Abstract

The human neuromuscular system can be seen as a versatile and extremely adaptive actuator. Through co-contraction and reex modulation, the properties of the neuromuscular system can be modified, leading to a change in movement response to externally applied forces. These properties are normally expressed in the form of the neuromuscular admittance. In a series of standard tasks, the force-, relax-, and position-task admittance of the neuromuscular system can be identified. However, the test signals used in these tasks can also limit the range of reex adaptation possible and wrong choice can create a phenomenon analogous to cross-over regression in manual control tasks, and force the human to use only a limited range of the possible reex adaptation. This paper presents a systematic investigation, through a model study, of the inuence of test signals on the range of reex adaptation. For this, criteria for test signal acceptability have been developed. The method is applied to the currently used test signals consisting of a high and a low shelf, and enables the selection of the high shelf bandwidth.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIFAC-PapersOnLine
Subtitle of host publication13th IFAC Symposium on Analysis, Design, and Evaluation ofHuman-Machine Systems HMS 2016
EditorsT. Sawaragi
Place of PublicationLaxenburg. Austria
PublisherElsevier
Pages266-271
Volume49
Edition19
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016
Event13th IFAC Symposium on Analysis, Design, and Evaluation of Human-Machine Systems - Kyoto, Japan
Duration: 30 Aug 20162 Sep 2016

Publication series

NameIFAC-PapersOnLine
PublisherIFAC-Elsevier
Number19
Volume49
ISSN (Electronic)2405-8963

Conference

Conference13th IFAC Symposium on Analysis, Design, and Evaluation of Human-Machine Systems
Abbreviated titleHMS 2016
CountryJapan
CityKyoto
Period30/08/162/09/16

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