Dynamic simulations of traditional masonry materials at different loading rates using an enriched damage delay: Theory and practical applications

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Abstract

A local damage model has been recently developed for the numerical simulation of the static behaviour of adobe bricks. Mesh insensitivity of the local model was obtained by generalizing the damage delay concept based on a Dirichlet boundary condition decomposition integrated in an implicit solver. The regularization properties of the model were proven before only in statics. In this study, mesh independence is demonstrated in dynamics analysing the problem of a cantilever bar uniaxially loaded at high deformation rates. Furthermore, the physical background of the delay formulation is interpreted regarding the main failure processes in compression exhibited by quasi brittle materials used in masonry. Two limitations of the model in correctly simulating the dynamic behaviour of masonry bricks have been observed. Corrections to the original damage delay formulation are proposed in this study. These enhance the capability of the model to address also distributed failure of traditional geo-materials and the inherent rate dependence also at high strain rate regimes. The improvements are demonstrated in this paper by means of numerical simulations of both theoretical tests and practical applications. These consist of experimental tests in compression recently performed by the authors at different strain rates, from statics to high velocity impact tests.

Original languageEnglish
Article number106576
Number of pages21
JournalEngineering Fracture Mechanics
Volume218
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Keywords

  • Adobe
  • Dynamic increase factor
  • High velocity impact and strain rate
  • Mesh dependence
  • Quasi brittle and ductile materials

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