Experimental investigation of the strength and stability of submarine pressure hulls with and without artificial corrosion damage

JR Mackay, MJ Smith, F van Keulen, TN Bosman, NG Pegg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A submarine may have to operate for a period of time with local corrosion damage in the pressure hull if a suitable repair method is unavailable or too expensive for implementation. This paper describes collapse tests on twenty ring-stiffened aluminium cylinders, which were conducted to study the effect of corrosion damage on hull strength and stability. Artificial hull thinning was found to reduce the collapse strength of experimental models through high local stresses in the corroded region. Leading to early onset of yielding and inelastic buckling. Bending associated with the eccentricity due to one-sided thinning was found to further increase the local stresses in the hull. Overall collapse pressures were more severely affected by corrosion damage than interframe collapse pressures. The percentage reduction in overall collapse pressure, compared with intact experimental models, was found to be closely related to the percentage depth of thinning. The accuracy of conventional collapse pressure predictions for the experimental models was significantly better for intact than for corroded cylinders.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)339-359
Number of pages21
JournalMarine Structures
Volume23
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Keywords

  • academic journal papers
  • CWTS JFIS < 0.75

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