Exploring the effect of complex hierarchic microstructure of quenched and partitioned martensitic stainless steels on their high cycle fatigue behaviour

A. Sierra-Soraluce, G. Li, M. J. Santofimia, J. M. Molina-Aldareguia, A. Smith, M. Muratori, I. Sabirov*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

12 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Recent studies have demonstrated the viability of quenching and partitioning (Q&P) treatment for processing martensitic stainless steels showing an improved balance of high strength and sufficient ductility. However, to date, the fatigue behaviour of these materials has not been explored. This study examines the effect of their complex hierarchic microstructure on high cycle fatigue performance. Three steels with different alloying element contents underwent Q&P processing, resulting in multiphase microstructures rich in retained austenite. High cycle fatigue tests and analysis of fatigue fracture surfaces were performed using SEM and EBSD techniques. The results indicate satisfactory high cycle fatigue performance in Q&P treated martensitic stainless steels, surpassing traditional counterparts. Fatigue cracks predominantly form and propagate along martensite packet and block boundaries, while prior austenite grain boundaries and MnS inclusions have minimal influence on fatigue crack formation and growth. Microplastic deformation at the fatigue crack tip enhances local KAM values and triggers localized transformation of retained austenite grains. It is hypothesized that the developed Q&P treated martensitic stainless steels exhibit improved resistance to low cycle fatigue.

Original languageEnglish
Article number112286
Number of pages14
JournalMaterials and Design
Volume233
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2023

Keywords

  • Crack initiation
  • Crack propagation
  • Fatigue limit
  • Martensitic stainless steels
  • Quenching and partitioning
  • Retained austenite

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Exploring the effect of complex hierarchic microstructure of quenched and partitioned martensitic stainless steels on their high cycle fatigue behaviour'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this