Eye movements while cycling in GTA V

Pavlo Bazilinskyy, Niels Heisterkamp, Philine Luik, Stijn Klevering, Assia Haddou, Michiel Zult, George Dialynas, Dimitra Dodou, Joost de Winter

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceedings/Edited volumeConference contributionScientificpeer-review

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Abstract

A common limitation in human factors research is that vehicle simulators often lack perceptual fidelity. Video games, on the other hand, are becoming increasingly realistic and may be a promising tool for simulator-based human factors research. In this work, we explored whether an off-the-shelf video game is suitable for research purposes. We used Grand Theft Auto (GTA) V combined with a Smart Eye DR120 eye tracker to measure eye movements of participants cycling in hazardous traffic situations. Twenty-seven participants encountered various situations representative of urban cycling, such as intersection crossings, a car leaving a parking spot in front of the cyclist, and the opening of a car door in front of the cyclist. Data of participants’ gaze on the computer monitor as recorded by the eye tracker were translated into 3D coordinates in the virtual world, as well as into semantic information regarding the object where the participant was focusing on. We conclude that GTA V allows for the collection of useful data for human factors research.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of 12th International Symposium on Tools and Methods of Competitive Engineering (TMCE 2018)
EditorsImre Horváth, José Pablo Suárez
PublisherDelft University of Technology
Pages287-294
ISBN (Print)978-94-6186-910-4
Publication statusPublished - 2018
EventTMCE 2018: 12th International Symposium on Tools and Methods of Competitive Engineering - Las Palmas, Spain
Duration: 7 May 201811 May 2018

Conference

ConferenceTMCE 2018: 12th International Symposium on Tools and Methods of Competitive Engineering
CountrySpain
CityLas Palmas
Period7/05/1811/05/18

Keywords

  • simulation
  • bicycle
  • driving
  • hazard perception
  • gaming

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