Fifty years after the Schelling's Models of Segregation: Bibliometric analysis of the legacy of Schelling and the future directions of segregation research

Rūta Ubarevičienė*, Maarten van Ham, Tiit Tammaru

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

30 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

In 1969 Thomas C. Schelling published his paper “Models of Segregation” and in 1971 he published a follow-up paper introducing “Dynamic Models of Segregation”. Schelling's papers developed the theoretical models of interactive dynamics of individual residential choices, resulting in pronounced patterns of residential segregation at the city level. Even after 50+ years, the topic of residential segregation and sorting remains as relevant as when Schelling published his papers. The two Schelling papers have been cited more than 8000 times together, and have made a strong impact on the residential segregation literature and beyond. In this paper, we examine how Schelling's ideas have impacted empirical research on residential segregation, and thus contributed to a greater understanding of urban processes. We find that few empirical papers explicitly test the Schelling models in residential segregation studies, and there are a growing number of influential papers in the field of segregation that do not reference Schelling. However, the papers by Schelling have served as a source of inspiration for a diverse set of empirical studies, new ways of defining neighbourhoods and developing more comprehensive theories of segregation.

Original languageEnglish
Article number104838
Number of pages12
JournalCities
Volume147
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2024

Funding

This study was funded by the Estonian Research Council Grants PRG306 “Understanding the Vicious Circles of Segregation. A Geographic Perspective” and PRG1996 “Living segregated lives: Exploring changes in spatial inequalities in digitally transforming societies”, “Centre of Excellence in Energy Efficiency” and the Estonian Academy of Sciences (research professorship of Tiit Tammaru).

Keywords

  • Dynamic models
  • Preferences
  • Residential mobility
  • Schelling
  • Segregation

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Fifty years after the Schelling's Models of Segregation: Bibliometric analysis of the legacy of Schelling and the future directions of segregation research'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this