Global mapping of seaport operability risk indicators using open-source metocean data

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Abstract

Seaport operability is key to the economic viability of ports. Metocean conditions (e.g., wind, short waves, and infragravity waves) affect this operability when certain thresholds are exceeded. This paper describes a method for the global mapping of seaport operability risk indicators using open-source metocean data. This global-scale assessment provides a geographic overview of operability risks and first-order insights into the most relevant metocean risk indicators at each location. The results show that locations around the equator and inland seas have lower operability risk than locations farther away from the equator. “Hotspots” are mainly located along the southern capes (Cape of Good Hope, Leeuwin, Horn), around the ‘Roaring Forties’, and at exposed locations along the oceans. Of the metocean parameters considered, short waves are found to be the most critical risk indicator for port operability at most locations. Using (the insights of) this study, port authorities, operators, and designers can prepare for metocean risks at an early stage and effectively respond with mitigation measures and layout adjustments to improve port operability.

Original languageEnglish
Article number695
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Marine Science and Engineering
Volume9
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Keywords

  • Downtime
  • ERA5
  • Global mapping
  • Infragravity waves
  • Metocean
  • Port operability
  • Seaports
  • Short waves
  • Wind

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