Going digital: Persistent identifiers for research samples, resources and instruments

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

    1 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    The uptake of Persistent Identifiers (PIDs) has increased in recent years and has improved the Findability, Accessibility, Interoperability and Reusability (FAIR) of various research related objects (e.g., data, software, researchers and research organisations). The uptake of PIDs for physical aspects of research (such as samples, artefacts, reagents and analyses instruments) has thus far been embraced primarily for use in the fields of Earth and life Sciences. Wider adoption of PIDs for physical aspects of research can improve the findability and accessibility of these resources, which will allow for data to be put into more detailed context. By using PIDs all the information about a sample or artefact could be more easily available in a single location, allowing for persistent links to other sources of relevant information. Through the use of interoperable (metadata) standards and shared forms of documentation it will be easier to collaborate across multiple disciplines and the reusability of resulting data and the physical samples and artefacts themselves will improve. Wider adoption of PIDs for physical aspects of research is challenging, as research communities will have to work together to establish relevant standards that are meaningful across multiple domains. The infrastructure for wider adoption already exists, it is now up to research communities to adopt standards and PIDs for the physical aspects of their research and up to funding and research institutes to support this broader adoption.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article number46
    Pages (from-to)1-8
    JournalData Science Journal
    Volume19
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2020

    Keywords

    • Data
    • FAIR
    • Persistent identifiers
    • Physical samples
    • PIDs

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Going digital: Persistent identifiers for research samples, resources and instruments'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this