High strain-rate effects from blast loads on laminated glass: An experimental investigation of the post-fracture bending moment capacity based on time–temperature mapping of interlayer yield stress

S. C. Angelides, J. P. Talbot, M. Overend

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Abstract

To enhance the resilience of buildings, laminated glass panels are increasingly used in glazed façades. These ductile panels provide a superior blast resistance to that provided by monolithic glass panels, due to the improved residual capacity offered by the polymer interlayer following the fracture of the glass layers. The complex interaction between the attached glass fragments and the interlayer is still only partially understood. To help address this, this paper investigates experimentally the post-fracture bending moment capacity of laminated glass. Three-point bending tests are performed at low temperature on specimens pre-fractured before testing, to ensure controlled and repeatable fracture patterns. The low temperature simulates the effects of the high strain-rates that result from short-duration blast loads by taking advantage of the time–temperature dependency of the viscoelastic interlayer. In these experiments, polyvinyl butyral is considered as the interlayer, this being the most common interlayer for laminated glass used in building facades. A new time–temperature mapping equation is derived from experimental results available in the literature, to relate the temperatures and strain-rates that result in the same interlayer yield stress. The results of the low-temperature tests demonstrate an enhancement of the ultimate load capacity of the fractured glass by two orders of magnitude, compared to that at room temperature. This suggests an improved post-fracture bending moment capacity associated with the now stiffer interlayer working in tension and the glass fragments working in compression. Due to the time–temperature dependency of the interlayer, a similar enhancement is therefore anticipated at the high strain-rates associated with typical blast loading. Finally, the assumed composite bending action is further supported by the results from additional specimens with thicker PVB and glass layers, which result in enhanced capacity consistent with the bending theory of existing analytical models.

Original languageEnglish
Article number121658
Number of pages12
JournalConstruction and Building Materials
Volume273
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Keywords

  • Blast response
  • Laminated glass
  • Post-fracture
  • Strain-rate
  • Time-temperature mapping

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