Human-robot cooperative object manipulation with contact changes

Michael Gienger, Dirk Ruiken, Tamas Bates, Mohamed Regaieg, M. Meibner, Jens Kober, Philipp Seiwald, Arne Christoph Hildebrandt

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceedings/Edited volumeConference contributionScientificpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)
75 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This paper presents a system for cooperatively manipulating large objects between a human and a robot. This physical interaction system is designed to handle, transport, or manipulate large objects of different shapes in cooperation with a human. Unique points are the bi-manual physical cooperation, the sequential characteristic of the cooperation including contact changes, and a novel architecture combining force interaction cues, interactive search-based planning, and online trajectory and motion generation. The resulting system implements a mixed initiative collaboration strategy, deferring to the human when his intentions are unclear, and driving the task once understood. This results in an easy and intuitive human-robot interaction. It is evaluated in simulations and on a bi-manual mobile robot with 32 degrees of freedom.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings 2018 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2018)
EditorsCarlos Balaguer, Hajime Asama, Danica Kragic, Kevin Lynch
Place of PublicationPiscataway, NJ, USA
PublisherIEEE
Pages1354-1360
ISBN (Electronic)978-1-5386-8094-0
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018
Event2018 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, IROS 2018 - Madrid, Spain
Duration: 1 Oct 20185 Oct 2018

Conference

Conference2018 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, IROS 2018
CountrySpain
CityMadrid
Period1/10/185/10/18

Keywords

  • Robot sensing systems
  • Task analysis
  • Planning
  • Robot kinematics
  • Trajectory
  • Synchronization

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