Incentives and politics: The perverse incentives paradox: root cause of many other paradoxes; the case of the Dutch Betuweroute

G.P. van Wee*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceedings/Edited volumeChapterScientificpeer-review

49 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The transport system in general, and, more specifically, transport infrastructure projects as part of that system, has major impacts on society. This chapter elaborates on the question as to what extent the results can be transferred to other contexts. Because of the positive decision to build, combined with a lack of understanding of the rationale and no clear and neutral assessment of the pros and cons of the line, many people felt manipulated, although on the positive side, the process also contributed to important improvements in decision-making procedures. This chapter departs from what Samset and Volden refer to as ‘the paradox of perverse incentives’: public investments with no financial obligations for the target group may cause perverse incentives and result in counterproductive projects. It also makes clear that many things went wrong, such as having no clear explanation of the problems the line was supposed to solve, or the related challenges.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Front-end of Large Public Projects
Subtitle of host publicationParadoxes and Ways Ahead
EditorsTerry M. Williams, Knut Samset, Gro Holst Volden
PublisherTaylor & Francis
Chapter6
Pages130-157
Number of pages28
Edition1
ISBN (Electronic)9781003257172
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Incentives and politics: The perverse incentives paradox: root cause of many other paradoxes; the case of the Dutch Betuweroute'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this