Influence of posture variation on shoulder muscle activity, heart rate, and perceived exertion in a repetitive manual task

Tessy Luger, Svend Erik Mathiassen, Tim Bosch, Marco Hoozemans, Marjolein Douwes, DirkJan Veeger, Michiel de Looze

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Abstract

In repetitive work, more physical variation is believed to reduce the risk of eventually developing musculoskeletal disorders. We investigated the extent to which workstation designs leading to more variation in upper arm postures during a pick-and-place task influenced outcomes of relevance to musculoskeletal disorder risk, including muscle activity, cardiovascular response, and perceived exertion, measured through the maximal acceptable work pace. Posture variation to the extent obtained in our experiment had only minor effects on these outcomes, and considerably less impact than a moderate change in working height. Apparently, substantial manipulations of the workstation or of the work task will be needed to accomplish variation to an extent that can significantly change outcomes of relevance to occupational musculoskeletal disorders and, thus, represent a potential for reduction in musculoskeletal disorder risk.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)47-64
JournalIIE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Keywords

  • Arm elevation
  • exposure variation
  • maximal acceptable work pace
  • muscle activity
  • repetitive work

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