Influence of process-based, stochastic and deterministic methods for representing heterogeneity in fluvial geothermal systems

Márton Major, Alexandros Daniilidis*, Thomas Mejer Hansen, Mark Khait, Denis Voskov

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
33 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Focus is on comparing stochastic, process-based and deterministic methods for modelling heterogeneity in hydraulic properties of fluvial geothermal reservoirs. Models are considered a generalized representation of a fluvial sequence in the upper part of the Gassum Formation in northern Denmark. Two ensemble realizations of process-based and stochastic heterogeneity were simulated using the state-of-the-art numerical modelling software, Delft Advanced Research Terra Simulator (DARTS), to assess differences on a statistically relevant sample size. Simulator settings were optimized to achieve two orders of magnitude improvement in simulation time. Our general findings show that the stochastic and process-based methods produce nearly identical results in terms of predicted breakthrough time and production temperature decline for high net-to-gross ratios (N/G). Simple homogenous and layered models overestimate breakthrough and underestimate temperature decline. More complex representation of facies in process-based models show smaller variance in results and stay within the limits of ensemble runs compared to simpler facies representation. Results indicate that a multivariate Gaussian based stochastic representation of heterogeneity provides comparable thermal response to a process-based model in fluvial systems of similar quality.

Original languageEnglish
Article number102651
Number of pages14
JournalGeothermics
Volume109
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2023

Keywords

  • Directuse
  • Geothermal
  • Heterogeneity
  • Process-based
  • Stochastic
  • Thermal response

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