Ink-bottle effect and pore size distribution of cementitious materials identified by pressurization-depressurization cycling mercury intrusion porosimetry

Yong Zhang, Bin Yang, Zhengxian Yang*, Guang Ye

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

43 Citations (Scopus)
221 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Capturing the long-term performance of concrete must be underpinned by a detailed understanding of the pore structure. Mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) is a widely used technique for pore structure characterization. However, it has been proven inappropriate to measure the pore size distribution of cementitious materials due to the ink-bottle effect. MIP with cyclic pressurization-depressurization can overcome the ink-bottle effect and enables a distinction between large (ink-bottle) pores and small (throat) pores. In this paper, pressurization-depressurization cycling mercury intrusion porosimetry (PDC-MIP) is adopted to characterize the pore structure in a range of cementitious pastes cured from 28 to 370 days. The results indicate that PDC-MIP provides a more accurate estimation of the pore size distribution in cementitious pastes than the standard MIP. Bimodal pore size distributions can be obtained by performing PDC-MIP measurements on cementitious pastes, regardless of the age. Water-binder ratio, fly ash and limestone powder have considerable influences on the formation of capillary pores ranging from 0.01 to 0.5 μm.
Original languageEnglish
Article number1454
Number of pages15
JournalMaterials
Volume12
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Keywords

  • Cementitious
  • Ink-bottle
  • Mercury porosimetry
  • Pore size distribution
  • Pressurization-depressurization

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