Land Degradation in the Dinder and Rahad Basins: Interactions Between Hydrology, Morphology and Ecohydrology in the Dinder National Park, Sudan

K.E.A. Hassaballah

Research output: ThesisDissertation (TU Delft)

83 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The spatial and temporal variability of the hydro-climate as well as land use and land cover (LULC) changes are among the most challenging problems facing water resources management. Understanding the interaction between climate variability, land use and land cover changes and their links to hydrology, river morphology and ecohydrology in the Dinder and Rahad basins in Sudan is confronted by the lack of climatic, hydrological and ecological data.
This book investigated the impacts of land degradation on the Dinder and Rahad hydrology and morphology, and interlinkage to the ecohydrological system of the Dinder National Park (DNP) in Sudan. It used an ensemble of techniques to improve our understanding of the hydrological processes and LULC changes in these basins. This included long-term trend analysis of hydroclimatic variables, LULC changes analysis, field measurements, rainfall-runoff modelling, hydrodynamic and morphological modelling of the Dinder river and its floodplain, with special focus on the Mayas wetlands. Moreover, this research is the first study to investigate the eco-hydrology of the DNP. It is expected that the results of the study will be beneficial to all stakeholders concerned and support decision-making processes for better management of water resources and ecosystem conservation in the area and possibly beyond.
Original languageEnglish
Awarding Institution
  • Delft University of Technology
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Uhlenbrook, S., Supervisor
  • Abbas Mohamedali, Y., Advisor
Award date9 Nov 2020
Publisher
Print ISBNs978-0-367-68355-9
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Bibliographical note

Dissertation submitted in fulfillment of the requirements of the Board for Doctorates of Delft University of Technology and of the Academic Board of IHE Delft Institute for Water Education.

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