Loose parts for children with autism: Design opportunities and implications

G. Hoogslag, Boudewijn Boon

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceedings/Edited volumeConference contributionScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Loose parts are ambiguous and open-ended materials that provide endless possibilities in children’s play. Loose parts foster creative and dramatic play which in turn stimulates the development of children’s social, emotional and cognitive skills. In this paper we explore the potential value of loose parts for children with autism because their development of said skills tends to either not happen or at a very low pace. We describe the effects of a lagging Theory of Mind and Sensory Integration Disorder, which are both often associated with autistic spectrum disorders. This brings the diverse and complex nature of these disorders to light, virtually excluding universal design guidelines. However, several concrete design implications and opportunities are suggested. Our next steps entail engaging with autistic children in their context and trying out tailor made loose parts.


Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Tenth International Conference on Design and Emotion - Celebration & Contemplation
EditorsP.M.A. Desmet, S.F. Fokkinga, G.D.S. Ludden, N. Cila, H. Van Zuthem
Place of PublicationAmsterdam
PublisherThe Design & Emotion Society
Pages608-611
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)978-94-6186-725-4
Publication statusPublished - 2016
EventThe 10th International Conference on Design and Emotion - Celebration & Contemplation: D&E 2016 - Amsterdam, Netherlands
Duration: 27 Sep 201630 Sep 2016

Conference

ConferenceThe 10th International Conference on Design and Emotion - Celebration & Contemplation
CountryNetherlands
CityAmsterdam
Period27/09/1630/09/16

Keywords

  • Autism
  • Design for play
  • Inclusive design
  • Child development
  • Sensory integration disorder

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