Measuring the added value of workplace change. Comparison between Theory and Practice

DJM van der Voordt, C Riratanaphong

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceedings/Edited volumeConference contributionScientificpeer-review

41 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Purpose: Worldwide organisations have introduced more flexibility in place, time and ways of working. In order to be able to define the added value of workplace change, a clear performance measurement system is needed to measure organisational performance in connection to real estate before and after the change. This paper compares various performance measurement systems from the literature with current performance management in practice in search of opportunities for improvement and prioritization.
Methodology: In addition to a review of literature, three case studies were conducted, two in Thailand and one in the Netherlands. Special attention is paid to appraisal of change by the end users i.e. employee satisfaction and perceived productivity support .
Findings: Many performance criteria and KPIs from literature are used in practice. However, apart from the Balanced Scorecard no other performance measurement system from literature is literally applied. Regarding most issues, none of the organisations conducted a sound comparison of the impact of their real estate on organisational performance before and after the change. In one case only both ex ante and ex post data were collected about the appraisal of change by the end users. Employees’ appraisals showed to be linked to the location of the building, the office concept, the experience value of the exterior and interior design, and technical equipment.
Practical implications: The proposed performance measures can be used as a reference frame for value adding management of facilities. Based on the findings a step-by-step procedure has been developed to facilitate the selection of prioritized key performance indicators.
Research limitations: The number of cases is limited. Additional case studies in depth are needed to get a wider picture of practice. Besides, still much work has to be done to operationalize all performance criteria.
Originality/value: This research connects the worlds of performance measurement and added value of workplace change in two different contexts.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the CIB Facilities Management Conference
Pages1-12
Number of pages12
Publication statusPublished - 2014
EventUsing Facilities in an open world, creating value for all stakeholders, Joint CIB W070, W11 & W118 conference, Copenhagen, Denmark - s.l.
Duration: 21 May 201423 May 2014

Conference

ConferenceUsing Facilities in an open world, creating value for all stakeholders, Joint CIB W070, W11 & W118 conference, Copenhagen, Denmark
Period21/05/1423/05/14

Keywords

  • Workplace change
  • performance measurement
  • adding value management
  • stakeholders

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Measuring the added value of workplace change. Comparison between Theory and Practice'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Research Output

    Culture

    van der Voordt, T. & van Meel, J., 2016, Facilities Management and Corporate Real Estate Management as Value Drivers: How to measure and manage adding value. Jensen, P. A. & van der Voordt, T. (eds.). London: Routledge - Taylor & Francis Group, p. 104-121

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceedings/Edited volumeChapterScientific

  • FM and CREM Interventions

    Jensen, P. A. & van der Voordt, T., 2016, Facilities Management and Corporate Real Estate Management as Value Drivers: How to measure and manage adding value. Jensen, P. A. & van der Voordt, T. (eds.). London: Routledge - Taylor & Francis Group, p. 14-28

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceedings/Edited volumeChapterScientific

  • Cite this

    van der Voordt, DJM., & Riratanaphong, C. (2014). Measuring the added value of workplace change. Comparison between Theory and Practice. In Proceedings of the CIB Facilities Management Conference (pp. 1-12)