Non-linear velocity obstacles with applications to the maritime domain

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceedings/Edited volumeConference contributionScientificpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ship collision is the most common accident on sea and usually causes financial loss and environmental pollution. Therefore, ship collision prevention always drew numerous attention in the maritime domain. Although some traditional approaches have been widely used in practice, e.g. CPA (Closest Point of Approach) and CTPA (Collision Threat Parameters Area), they all assume that the ships are moving in straight-lines with constant speed which is far away from practice. To overcome this problem, we introduce the non-linear velocity obstacle (abbr. NL-VO) algorithm to improve the CTPA approach. By this improvement, a collision avoidance with non-linearly moving target-ships (TS) is available. TSs with different motions, e.g. a varying velocity, accelerating and turning, are employed in three scenarios to demonstrate the NL-VO algorithm. The result shows that the traditional approach fails in these cases, but the NL-VO can fulfil the functions: judge whether the own-ship (OS) is in danger and find a proper collision-free path.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMaritime Transportation and Harvesting of Sea Resources
EditorsC. Guedes Soares, Angelo P. Teixeira
PublisherCRC Press / Balkema - Taylor & Francis Group
Pages999-1007
Number of pages9
ISBN (Print)9780815379935
Publication statusPublished - 2018
Event17th International Congress of the International Maritime Association of the Mediterranean, IMAM 2017 - Lisbon, Portugal
Duration: 9 Oct 201711 Oct 2017

Publication series

NameMaritime Transportation and Harvesting of Sea Resources
Volume2

Conference

Conference17th International Congress of the International Maritime Association of the Mediterranean, IMAM 2017
Country/TerritoryPortugal
CityLisbon
Period9/10/1711/10/17

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