On Collusion and Coercion: Agent Interconnectedness and In-Group Behaviour

F. Jordan Srour, Neil Yorke-Smith*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceedings/Edited volumeConference contributionScientificpeer-review

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Abstract

The interconnectedness of actors is an antecedent for collective corruption, which in turn can lead to endemic corruption in a society. As a testbed for studying the effects of social interconnectedness on corrupt behaviours, we examine the domain of maritime customs. We add to our existing agent-based simulation a nuanced model of actor relatedness, consisting of clan, in-group (sect), and place of origin, and encode associated behavioural norms. We examine in simulation the effects of social interconnectedness on domain performance metrics such as container outcomes, delay, revenue, collusion, and coercive demands. Results confirm that, when corruption is widespread, localized punitive- or incentive-based policies are weakened, and that the effect of process re-engineering is frustrated when interconnectedness increases beyond a critical point, for two out of three forms of homophily connections. Our work connects with and provides a complementary methodology to works in the political economy literature.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 17th International Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems (AAMAS 2018)
PublisherInternational Foundation for Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems (IFAAMAS)
Pages1622-1630
Number of pages9
ISBN (Print)9781510868083
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2018
Event17th International Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems, AAMAS 2018 - Stockholm, Sweden
Duration: 10 Jul 201815 Jul 2018

Conference

Conference17th International Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems, AAMAS 2018
CountrySweden
CityStockholm
Period10/07/1815/07/18

Keywords

  • Agent-based simulation
  • Ethics
  • Maritime customs
  • Social networks

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