Predictive simulations of human walking produce realistic cost of transport at a range of speeds

Carmichael F. Ong, Thomas Geijtenbeek, Jennifer L. Hicks, Scott L. Delp

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractScientific

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Abstract

Predictive simulations of human walking have great potential to expand our understanding of locomotion. For instance, they can isolate the effect of specific impairments on observed gait pathologies or aid in designing assistive devices by modeling human-device interactions. Introducing simulated impairments or adding augmentation devices to a model may change kinematics, including preferred walking speed. Experimental studies have characterized cost of transport over a wide range of walking speeds, and have shown that humans prefer walking at a speed that minimizes their cost of transport [1]. The purpose of this study was to use a predictive simulation framework to reproduce experimental energetic cost of transport. We trained a model to walk at speeds between 0.5 and 2.0 m/s and compared our simulated cost of transport to experimental data.
Original languageEnglish
Pages19-20
Publication statusPublished - 2017
Event16th International Symposium on Computer Simulation in Biomechanics - Gold Coast, Australia
Duration: 20 Jul 201722 Jul 2017

Conference

Conference16th International Symposium on Computer Simulation in Biomechanics
CountryAustralia
CityGold Coast
Period20/07/1722/07/17

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    Ong, C. F., Geijtenbeek, T., Hicks, J. L., & Delp, S. L. (2017). Predictive simulations of human walking produce realistic cost of transport at a range of speeds. 19-20. Abstract from 16th International Symposium on Computer Simulation in Biomechanics, Gold Coast, Australia.