(Re)discovering the lost middle: intergenerational inheritances and economic inequality in urban and regional research

Julie MacLeavy, David Manley

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

    8 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This paper calls for deepening understandings of inequality and the reproduction of inequality across the income distribution. In particular, it brings intergenerational transmissions and place effects, their interaction and progression over time into greater focus. The objective is to understand the implications of increasing inequality for those in the large and under-researched ‘middle group’. The paper makes the case for urban and regional research that uses extensive longitudinal data, both qualitative and quantitative, to reveal the totality of the processes impacting the middle group, from those who are just managing to those who are advancing and flourishing.

    Original languageEnglish
    Number of pages12
    JournalRegional Studies
    DOIs
    Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 8 May 2018

    Keywords

    • economic inequality
    • intergenerational inheritances
    • life-course experiences
    • longitudinal analysis
    • social class
    • social mobility

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