Reinforcement learning models of emotion: Computational challenges

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Abstract

In this paper we address the field that computationally studies the relation between adaptive behavior and emotion. This field studies how affective phenomena emerge from simulated adaptive agents and how these agents and their human interaction partners can benefit from this. In particular, we focus on four major challenges when adaptive behavior is operationalized as an agent that learns to solve a task using reinforcement learning (RL) and affect is a signal that is derived from RL primitives and emerges during the interaction of the agent with its environment. For example, learned state utility, V (s), is a signal that resembles fear (negative) and hope (positive), because these emotions signal the anticipation of loss or gain. The four challenges resolve around the following questions: why would a particular signal be labeled as an emotion; is there a generic structure in humans to how mood, emotion and appraisal influence reinforcement learning and action selection; what should benchmark tests look like if we want to investigate the plausibility and effectiveness of an emotional instrumentation of RL; are there other benefits to emotion instrumentation than increased adaptive potential for artificial agents?

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of AISB Annual Convention 2017
EditorsM. De Vos, J. Padget, J. Bryson
Place of PublicationBath
PublisherThe Society for the Study of Artificial Intelligence and Simulation of Behaviour
Pages168-172
Number of pages5
Publication statusPublished - 2017
EventAISB 2017: Annual Convention of the Society for the Study of Artificial Intelligence and the Simulation of Behaviour - Bath, United Kingdom
Duration: 18 Apr 201721 Apr 2017

Conference

ConferenceAISB 2017
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityBath
Period18/04/1721/04/17

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  • Cite this

    Broekens, J. (2017). Reinforcement learning models of emotion: Computational challenges. In M. De Vos, J. Padget, & J. Bryson (Eds.), Proceedings of AISB Annual Convention 2017 (pp. 168-172). The Society for the Study of Artificial Intelligence and Simulation of Behaviour.