Safety in passenger ships: The influence of environmental design characteristics on people's perception of safety

Markus Ahola, Ruth Mugge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although objective safety is a widely studied topic in ergonomics, subjective safety has received far less research attention. Nevertheless, most of human decision-making and behavior depends on how we perceive our environment. This study investigates the effects of various environmental design characteristics
on people's safety perception in a passenger ship context. Five different environmental design characteristics were manipulated to increase the openness of the space or to create more clear navigation, resulting in 20 different cabin corridors for a passenger ship. Ninety-seven respondents were asked to rate these corridors on the perceived safety in an experiment. The results showed that people feel more safe when the corridors have a curved ceiling, when the walls do not have a split-level design, and when there is a view to the outside. Designers can use these insights when designing future environments.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)143-152
Number of pages10
JournalApplied Ergonomics: human factors in technology and society
Volume59
Issue numberPart A
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Keywords

  • Perception
  • Safety
  • Architectural design
  • Environmental design

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