Seismic velocity characterisation and survey design to assess CO2 injection performance at Kızıldere geothermal field

Mahmut PARLAKTUNA*, Sevket Durucan, Burak PARLAKTUNA, Çağlar SINAYUÇ, Martijn T.G. Janssen, Erdinç ŞENTÜRK, Erinç TONGUÇ, Öncü DEMİRCİOĞLU, Flavio POLETTO, More Authors

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

38 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The noncondensable gases in most geothermal resources include CO2 and smaller amounts of other gases. Currently, the worldwide geothermal power is a small sector within the energy industry, and CO2 emissions related to the utilisation of geothermal resources are consequently small. In some countries, however, such as Turkey and Iceland, geothermal energy production contributes significantly to their energy budget, and their CO2 emissions are relatively significant. SUCCEED is a targeted innovation and research project, which aims to investigate the reinjection of CO2 produced at geothermal power production sites and develop, test, and demonstrate at field scale innovative measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV) technologies that can be used in most CO2 geological storage projects. The project is carried out at two operating geothermal energy production sites, the Kızıldere geothermal field in Turkey and the CarbFix project site at the Hellisheiði geothermal field in Iceland. Together with a brief description of the project, this paper presents the details of the two field sites and the progress made in seismic velocity characterisation and modelling relevant to the Kızıldere geothermal field in Turkey.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1061-1075
Number of pages15
JournalTurkish Journal of Earth Sciences
Volume30
Issue number SI-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Keywords

  • Geothermal energy
  • CO2 emissions
  • CO2 utilisation and storage
  • Kızıldere

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Seismic velocity characterisation and survey design to assess CO2 injection performance at Kızıldere geothermal field'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this