Semi-automated approach for detailed layout generation during early stage surface warship design

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Abstract

During the concept definition design phase, significant effort is paid to the detailing of the internal layout of ships. At the Dutch Defence Materiel Organisation first a high level ‘functional arrangement’ is generated, which is further detailed into a ‘general arrangement plan’ (GAP), to validate the functional arrangement. The GAP generation takes considerable effort. Therefore, this paper proposes a novel method, called WARGEAR (WARship GEneral ARrangement), to support the designer with the generation of GAPs. The method aims to provide quick insight in the feasibility of the functional arrangement, i.e. check whether all spaces fit and can be connected via hallways and staircases according to international and naval rules. WARGEAR applies a new seed and growth algorithm as well as a ship’s network representation to semi-automatically generate detailed layouts based on predefined functional arrangements. A multi-deck and multi-compartment case study is presented as a proof of concept of the tool.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 19th International Conference on Computer Applications in Shipbuilding, ICCAS 2019
PublisherRoyal Institution of Naval Architects
Volume2
ISBN (Electronic)978-000000000-2
Publication statusPublished - 2019
Event19th International Conference on Computer Applications in Shipbuilding (ICCAS) - Rotterdam, Netherlands
Duration: 24 Sep 201926 Sep 2019

Conference

Conference19th International Conference on Computer Applications in Shipbuilding (ICCAS)
CountryNetherlands
CityRotterdam
Period24/09/1926/09/19

Keywords

  • Computer aided design
  • Design insight
  • Detailed layout plan
  • Seed and growth algorithm
  • Ship layout design

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