Simulating vision loss: What levels of impairment are actually represented?

Joy Goodman-Deane*, Sam Waller, Alice Catherine Collins, P. John Clarkson

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceedings/Edited volumeConference contributionScientificpeer-review

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Capability loss simulators give designers a brief experience of some of the functional effects of capability loss. They are an effective method of helping people to understand the impact of capability loss on product use. However, it is also important that designers know what levels of loss are being simulated and how they relate to the user population. The study in this paper tested the Cambridge Simulation Glasses with 25 participants to determine the effect of different numbers of glasses on a person's visual acuity. This data is also related to the glasses' use in usability assessment. A procedure is described for determining the number of simulator glasses with which the visual detail on a product is just visible. This paper then explains how to calculate the proportion of the UK population who would be unable to distinguish that detail.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationContemporary Ergonomics and Human Factors 2013
Pages347-354
Number of pages8
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes
EventInternational Conference on Contemporary Ergonomics and Human Factors 2013 - Cambridge, United Kingdom
Duration: 15 Apr 201318 Apr 2013

Conference

ConferenceInternational Conference on Contemporary Ergonomics and Human Factors 2013
Country/TerritoryUnited Kingdom
CityCambridge
Period15/04/1318/04/13

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