Synthesis and characterization of novel eco-epoxy adhesives based on the modified tannic acid for self-healing joints

Nataša Z. Tomić*, Milad Saeedifar, Mohamed Nasr Saleh, Aleksandar Marinković, Dimitrios Zarouchas, Sofia Teixeira de Freitas

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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Abstract

The aim of this research was to investigate the self-healing potential of damaged Al joints when bonded using novel eco-epoxide adhesives derived from tannic acid (TA). Two eco-epoxy components based on TA, (A) glycidyl ether and (B) glycidyl phosphate ester of TA, were produced. The effect of the eco-epoxy components on the self-healing ability was assessed in terms of the energy dissipation recovery after partial failure in a double cantilever beam (DCB) test, which was compared to the reference epoxy (R). The self-healing process required 2 h and 2 bars in an autoclave at 180 °C. Techniques such as DSC, FTIR and DMA showed residual activity and potential self-healing capability of the used adhesives. A combination of two monitoring techniques, Digital Image Correlation (DIC) and Acoustic Emission (AE), was used to monitor the strain distribution and damage propagation in the DCB specimens. The healing index for adhesives R, B and A was found to be 8.9%, 3.0%, and 82.5% respectively. The findings of this work highlighted the potential of using bio-based epoxy adhesives in structural adhesive bonding, as well as the prospect of utilizing their self-healing ability to restore the strength of such bonded parts.

Original languageEnglish
Article number107444
JournalPolymer Testing
Volume106
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022

Keywords

  • Acoustic emission
  • Adhesion
  • Eco-epoxy
  • Self-healing
  • Tannic acid

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