The Context Dependency of Two Popular Persuasive Game Design Principles

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Abstract

This paper explores the context dependency of two popular persuasive game design principles in order to improve their effective implementation. Because of limited guidelines the choice and suitability of a persuasive game design principle is often based on a designer’s own intuition. To prevent the use of badly chosen design principles that can be counterproductive, other authors showed the importance of tailoring the persuasive game design principles to various gamer personalities. In this paper we aim to further explore the context dependency of persuasive game design principles and suggest how designers can take this into account when selecting and implementing these principles. Noticing the underexposed role of attitudes concerning persuasion through technology (including persuasive game design principles) we chose the Elaboration Likelihood Model as a framework for our exploration. Findings show different scenarios that describe how both persuasive game design principles can either enhance or reduce the motivation and/or ability of the player to elaborate on the persuasive message of the game. Although theoretical and explorative, this paper may form a starting point for further experimental research on the context dependency of persuasive game design principles in order to improve their effective implementation.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNeo-Simulation and Gaming Toward Active Learning
Place of PublicationSingapore
PublisherSpringer
Pages453-461
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)978-981-13-8039-6
ISBN (Print)978-981-13-8038-9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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