The effect of liquid co-flow on gas fractions, bubble velocities and chord lengths in bubbly flows. Part I: Uniform gas sparging and liquid co-flow

Corné Muilwijk, Harry E.A. Van den Akker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
3 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Unique experiments were performed in a homogeneously sparged rectangular 400×200×2630 mm (W×D×H) bubble column with and without liquid co-flow. Bubbles in the range 4–7 mm were produced by needle spargers, which resulted in a very uniform bubble size. Dual-tip optical fibre probes were used to measure horizontal profiles of gas fractions, bubble velocities and bubble chord lengths for superficial gas velocities Usg in the range 0.63–6.25 cm/s and superficial liquid velocities Usl up to 20 cm/s. Images of the bubble column were captured and a Bubble Image Velocimetry technique was adopted to calculate bubble (parcel) velocities. For low gas fractions, when a homogeneous flow regime occurred, both methods agreed very well and the optical fibre probes were found to be rather accurate for our bubbles. A liquid co-flow was found to have a calming effect and to stabilize a homogeneous bubbly flow regime, with less spatial variation in gas fractions and bubble velocities. Bubble chord lengths were almost normally distributed and do not exhibit the theoretical triangular probability density functions. The mean cord lengths were in the range 1.9–3.5 mm and found to increase with Usg and to decrease slightly with increasing Usl, while a liquid co-flow significantly reduced the standard deviation of the chord length distribution.

Original languageEnglish
Article number103498
Number of pages17
JournalInternational Journal of Multiphase Flow
Volume137
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Keywords

  • Bubble column
  • Bubble image velocimetry
  • Chord length distribution
  • Gas hold-up
  • Liquid co-flow
  • Optical fibre probe

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