The influence of the surface roughness, creep and relaxation on the performance of elastomeric liners for sustainable glass bottle closures

Deniz Turan*, Johannes A. Poulis

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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Abstract

Glass bottles having a metal closure are preferred for oxygen sensitive beverages e.g. beer. Using thinner closure which comprise polyvinyl chloride-free component is more sustainable. However, protecting the sealing performance as a result of metal closure thickness reduction is challenging. Here we show the relation between the leakage in beer bottles and surface roughness of three different thermoplastic elastomer seals. Compression relaxation and creep-recovery behavior of seals have been analyzed by using a dynamic mechanical analyzer. The results showed that metal downsizing was possible with Liner A (low density polyethylene (LDPE)/styrene-ethylene-butylene-styrene) and B (LDPE/ styrene-butadiene-styrene), but not with Liner C (high-density polyethylene/butyl rubber). Optimizing smaller surface topography parameters such as the surface roughness depth Rz, kurtosis Sku, average void volume Vvv, arithmetic mean peak curvature Spc, the density of surface peaks Spd and higher peak material volume Vmp, peak material portion Smr resulted in a better sealing performance. Liner C was found to show an increased leakage risk, since there was a high level of stress relaxation leading to a reduced sealing force. The sealing liner material with low relaxation, low elastic modulus and high creep recovery compliance was found to ensure better sealing when thinner metal closures are used.

Original languageEnglish
Article number100840
JournalFood Packaging and Shelf Life
Volume32
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022

Keywords

  • DMA
  • Elastomer
  • Leakage
  • Seal
  • Stress relaxation
  • Surface analysis

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