The magic of ordinary rather than extraordinary resilience? Higher education and longer-term pandemic impacts

John R. Bryson, Lauren Andres, Aksel Ersoy, Louise Reardon

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceedings/Edited volumeChapterScientificpeer-review

Abstract

COVID-19 initially closed universities forcing rapid adoption of online teaching. This chapter reflects on pandemic recovery in the context of higher education and explores some of the longer-term impacts that the pandemic has had on academic practice. Recovery is a complex and highly differentiated process and is founded upon resilience that is configured from ordinary rather than extraordinary phenomena. These processes include established social relationships based on extant friendship networks combined with investments in digital skills and related infrastructures. The chapter explores pandemic legacies and higher education focussing on implications for practice as this relates to teaching, learning, research and administration.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPandemic Recovery?
Subtitle of host publicationReframing and Rescaling Societal Challenges
EditorsLauren Andres, John R. Bryson, Aksel Ersoy, Louise Reardon
Place of PublicationCheltenham/Northampton, MA
PublisherEdward Elgar Publishing
Chapter23
Pages322-332
Number of pages11
ISBN (Electronic)9781802201116
ISBN (Print)9781802201109
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2024

Bibliographical note

Green Open Access added to TU Delft Institutional Repository 'You share, we take care!' - Taverne project https://www.openaccess.nl/en/you-share-we-take-care
Otherwise as indicated in the copyright section: the publisher is the copyright holder of this work and the author uses the Dutch legislation to make this work public.

Keywords

  • higher education
  • pandemic recovery
  • ordinary resilience
  • improvisation
  • teaching and research

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