The Temporal Dynamics of Neighborhood Disadvantage in Childhood and Subsequent Problem Behavior in Adolescence

Tom Kleinepier, Maarten van Ham

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

    2 Citations (Scopus)
    16 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    Research on neighborhood effects has increasingly focused on how long children have lived in a deprived neighborhood during childhood (duration), but has typically ignored when in childhood the exposure occurred (timing) and whether neighborhood circumstances were improving or deteriorating (sequencing). In this article, the authors applied sequence analysis to simultaneously capture children’s duration, timing, and sequencing of exposure to neighborhood (dis)advantage in childhood. Logistic regression analysis was subsequently used to test how different patterns of exposure are related to teenage parenthood, school dropout, and delinquent behavior. Using register data from the Netherlands, an entire cohort was followed from birth in 1995 up until age 19 in 2014 (N = 168,645, 48.8% females, 83.2% native Dutch). Compared to children who had lived in a deprived neighborhood throughout childhood, children who were exposed to neighborhood deprivation only during adolescence were found to be equally likely to become a teenage parent and were even more likely to drop out of school. Unexpectedly, children who had lived in an affluent neighborhood throughout childhood were most likely to engage in delinquent behavior. Possible explanations and implications are discussed.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1611-1628
    JournalJournal of Youth and Adolescence: a multidisciplinary research publication
    Volume47
    Issue number8
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2018

    Keywords

    • Adolescence
    • Childhood
    • Neighborhood effects
    • Problem behavior
    • Sequence analysis
    • Temporal dynamics

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