A multi-phase biogeochemical model for mitigating earthquake-induced liquefaction via microbially induced desaturation and calcium carbonate precipitation

Caitlyn A. Hall*, Andre van Turnhout, Edward Kavazanjian, Leon A. van Paassen, Bruce Rittmann

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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Abstract

A next-generation biogeochemical model was developed to explore the impact of the native water source on microbially induced desaturation and precipitation (MIDP) via denitrification. MIDP is a non-disruptive, nature-based ground improvement technique that offers the promise of cost-effective mitigation of earthquake-induced soil liquefaction under and adjacent to existing structures. MIDP leverages native soil bacteria to reduce the potential for liquefaction triggering in the short term through biogenic gas generation (treatment completed within hours to days) and over the longer term through calcium carbonate precipitation (treatment completed in weeks to months). This next-generation biogeochemical model expands earlier modeling to consider multi-phase speciation, bacterial competition, inhibition, and precipitation. The biogeochemical model was used to explore the impact of varying treatment recipes on MIDP products and by-products in a natural seawater environment. The case study presented herein demonstrates the importance of optimizing treatment recipes to minimize unwanted by-products (e.g., H2S production) or incomplete denitrification (e.g., nitrate and nitrite accumulation).
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2903–2917
Number of pages15
JournalBiogeosciences
Volume20
Issue number14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2023

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