Creating Conjugated C−C Bonds between Commercial Carbon Electrode and Molecular Catalyst for Oxygen Reduction to Hydrogen Peroxide

Jasper Biemolt, Eva J. Meeus, Felix J. de Zwart, Jeen de Graaf, Petrus C.M. Laan, Bas de Bruin, Thomas Burdyny, Gadi Rothenberg*, Ning Yan

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

26 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Immobilizing molecular catalysts on electrodes is vital for electrochemical applications. However, creating robust electrode-catalyst interactions while maintaining good catalytic performance and rapid electron transfer is challenging. Here, without introducing any foreign elements, we show a bottom-up synthetic approach of constructing the conjugated C−C bond between the commercial Vulcan carbon electrode and an organometallic catalyst. Characterization results from FTIR, XPS, aberration-corrected TEM and EPR confirmed the successful and uniform heterogenization of the complex. The synthesized Vulcan-LN4−Co catalyst is highly active and selective in the oxygen reduction reaction in neutral media, showing an 80 % hydrogen peroxide selectivity and a 0.72 V (vs. RHE) onset potential which significantly outperformed the homogenous counterpart. Based on single-crystal XRD and NMR data, we built a model for density functional theory calculations which showed a nearly optimal binding energy for the *OOH intermediate. Our results show that the direct conjugated C−C bonding is an effective approach for heterogenizing molecular catalysts on carbon, opening new opportunities for employing molecular catalysts in electrochemical applications.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere202300841
Number of pages11
JournalChemSusChem
Volume16
Issue number18
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2023

Keywords

  • electrochemistry
  • immobilization
  • neutral media
  • organometallics
  • strong interaction

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Creating Conjugated C−C Bonds between Commercial Carbon Electrode and Molecular Catalyst for Oxygen Reduction to Hydrogen Peroxide'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this