Development of a stop criterion for load tests based on the critical shear displacement theory

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Abstract

The capacity of existing bridges is an important aspect regarding the safety of the traveling public. Proof load testing can be a useful option to evaluate if an existing bridge satisfies the requirements from the code. The stop criteria provided by the Guidelines are generally suitable for flexure only. Therefore, in this paper, shear is considered. When developing a stop criterion for shear for proof load tests on existing bridges, many different approaches could be taken. Here, a stop criterion is developed based on the Critical Shear Displacement Theory. The development of the stop criterion is based on the analysis of the contribution of each of the mechanisms of shear transfer. The criterion is verified with experiments on beams in the laboratory. The consequence of this
development is that now a stop criterion for shear with a theoretical basis is provided.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationLife-Cycle Analysis and Assessment in Civil Engineering
Subtitle of host publicationTowards an Integrated Vision - Proceedings of the 6th International Symposium on Life-Cycle Civil Engineering, IALCCE 2018
EditorsRobby Caspeele, Luc Taerwe, Dan M. Frangopol
PublisherCRC Press
Pages145-152
Number of pages8
Edition1
ISBN (Electronic)9781315228914
ISBN (Print)978-1-138-62633-1
Publication statusPublished - 2019
Event6th International Symposium on Life-Cycle Civil Engineering, IALCCE 2018 - Ghent, Belgium
Duration: 28 Oct 201831 Oct 2018
Conference number: 6
http://www.ialcce2018.org/#/home

Conference

Conference6th International Symposium on Life-Cycle Civil Engineering, IALCCE 2018
Abbreviated titleIALCCE 2018
CountryBelgium
CityGhent
Period28/10/1831/10/18
Internet address

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