Immediate versus delayed removal of urinary catheter after laparoscopic hysterectomy: A randomised controlled trial

E. M. Sandberg, A. R.H. Twijnstra, C. A. van Meir, H. S. Kok, N. van Geloven, K. Gludovacz, W. Kolkman, H.T.C. Nagel, L.C.F. Haans, K. Kapiteijn, F. W. Jansen

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Abstract

Objective: To evaluate if immediate catheter removal (ICR) after laparoscopic hysterectomy is associated with similar retention outcomes compared with delayed removal (DCR). Study design: Non-inferiority randomised controlled trial. Population: Women undergoing laparoscopic hysterectomy in six hospitals in the Netherlands. Methods: Women were randomised to ICR or DCR (between 18 and 24 hours after surgery). Primary outcome: The inability to void within 6 hours after catheter removal. Results: One hundred and fifty-five women were randomised to ICR (n = 74) and DCR (n = 81). The intention-to-treat and per-protocol analysis could not demonstrate the non-inferiority of ICR: ten women with ICR could not urinate spontaneously within 6 hours compared with none in the delayed group (risk difference 13.5%, 5.6–24.8, P = 0.88). However, seven of these women could void spontaneously within 9 hours without additional intervention. Regarding the secondary outcomes, eight women from the delayed group requested earlier catheter removal because of complaints (9.9%). Three women with ICR (4.1%) had a urinary tract infection postoperatively versus eight with DCR (9.9%, risk difference −5.8%, −15.1 to 3.5, P = 0.215). Women with ICR mobilised significantly earlier (5.7 hours, 0.8–23.3 versus 21.0 hours, 1.4–29.9; P ≤ 0.001). Conclusion: The non-inferiority of ICR could not be demonstrated in terms of urinary retention 6 hours after procedure. However, 70% of the women with voiding difficulties could void spontaneously within 9 hours after laparoscopic hysterectomy. It is therefore questionable if all observed urinary retention cases were clinically relevant. As a result, the clinical advantages of ICR may still outweigh the risk of bladder retention and it should therefore be considered after uncomplicated laparoscopic hysterectomy. Tweetable abstract: The advantages of immediate catheter removal after laparoscopic hysterectomy seem to outweigh the risk of bladder retention.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)804-813
JournalBJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Volume126
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Keywords

  • Laparoscopic hysterectomy
  • urinary catheter
  • urinary retention

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