Magnetic and electric antennas synergy for partial discharge measurements in gas-insulated substations: Power flow and reflection suppression

Christian Mier*, Armando Rodrigo Mor, Peter Vaessen, André Lathouwers

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

One of the main difficulties in measuring partial discharges (PD) in gas-insulated substations (GIS) is the overlapping of pulses at the sensor's location, which distorts the pulse resolution and the charge estimation. This research presents a new method called “synergy,” which identifies and suppresses reflections using magnetic and electric antennas in the very-high frequency range. By scaling the antennas’ outputs and adding them, it is possible to segregate forward and backward pulses. Additionally, by multiplying the electric and magnetic signals, the power flow of the pulses is obtained, which identifies the propagation direction and the location of discontinuities in the transmission path. The synergy method is evaluated in three scenarios: a fully matched test bench using a calibrated pulse, a full-scale GIS using a calibrated pulse, and a full-scale GIS using a PD defect. The results showed that the pulse reflections can be eliminated from the incident pulse, improving the charge calculation when the pulses overlap. The output of this research represents an improvement for PD monitoring in GIS, exhibiting a tool for better defect localization, pulse wave shape construction, charge estimation, and possible interference rejection.

Original languageEnglish
Article number108530
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Electrical Power and Energy Systems
Volume144
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2023

Keywords

  • GIS
  • magnetic antenna
  • partial discharges
  • PD sensors
  • pulse overlapping
  • UHF antenna

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Magnetic and electric antennas synergy for partial discharge measurements in gas-insulated substations: Power flow and reflection suppression'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this