Modelling the multiscale behaviour of claystone: Deformation, rupture, and hydro-mechanical phenomena around underground galleries

Benoît Pardoen, Frédéric Collin, Pierre Bésuelle, Robert Charlier, Jean Talandier, Stefano Dal Pont, Philippe Cosenza, Abraham P. Van Den Eijnden, Jacques Desrues

Research output: Contribution to journalConference articleScientificpeer-review

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Abstract

In the context of underground exploitation, the behaviour of rocks near galleries and tunnels conditions their stability. Underground drilling generates deformations, damage, fracturing, and significant modification of flow characteristics in the surrounding rock. However, the influence of small-scale characteristics and behaviour on the rock deformations and damage at engineering scale remains a complex issue. Consequently, the multiscale behaviour of a clay rock is modelled starting from the large scale of the excavation damaged zone around galleries and then enriching the approach by considering microstructural characteristics from the scale of mineral inclusions. Lastly, a double-scale numerical framework is considered. It allows to relate small- to large-scale rock behaviour in terms of deformations and material rupture. In fact, the development of damage and cracking at microscale allows to predict large-scale fracturing. The developed method focuses on a claystone in the particular context of long-term management of high-level nuclear wastes by deep geological repository. The results highlight the possibilities of double-scale computing in the prediction of the behaviour of underground engineering structures.

Original languageEnglish
Article number10003
Number of pages7
JournalE3S Web of Conferences
Volume205
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020
Event2nd International Conference on Energy Geotechnics, ICEGT 2020 - La Jolla, United States
Duration: 20 Sep 202023 Sep 2020

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