Resilience in practice: Five principles to enable societies to cope with extreme weather events

Karin de Bruijn, Joost Buurman, Marjolein Mens, Ruben Dahm, Frans Klijn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

52 Citations (Scopus)
45 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The concept of resilience is used by many in different ways: as a scientific concept, as a guiding principle, as inspirational ‘buzzword’, or as a means to become more sustainable. Next to the academic debate on meaning and notions of resilience, the concept has been widely adopted and interpreted in policy contexts, particularly related to climate change and extreme weather events. In addition to having a positive connotation, resilience may cover aspects that are missed in common disaster risk management approaches. Although the precise definition of resilience may remain subject of discussion, the views on what is important to consider in the management of extreme weather events do not differ significantly. Therefore, this paper identifies the key implications of resilience thinking for the management of extreme weather events and translates these into five practical principles for policy making.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)21-30
Number of pages10
JournalEnvironmental Science & Policy
Volume70
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Keywords

  • Disaster risk management
  • Extreme weather events
  • Resilience
  • Resilience principles

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